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New lawsuit filed against Brooklyn funeral home accused of storing bodies in U-Haul vans

Virus Outbreak Funeral Home
Posted at 4:18 PM, Jun 22, 2020
and last updated 2020-06-22 16:18:04-04

FLATLANDS, Brooklyn — A new lawsuit has been filed against a Brooklyn funeral home accused of storing bodies of dead coronavirus victims in U-Haul vans, the law firm representing the victim’s family said Monday.

A spokesperson for Morgan & Morgan, the law firm representing the family of Nathaniel Hallman, a COVID-19 victim, said the family was “unwittingly entangled in the heartbreaking discoveries of abandoned, neglected, desecrated human remains at a Brooklyn funeral home.”

Andrew T. Cleckley Funeral Home, Inc. was accused of storing dozens of bodies in U-Haul vans outside the funeral home instead of storing them properly as they’re charged to by the state health department.

The funeral home had its license suspended.

Also mentioned in the latest lawsuit, filed Friday in a Bronx court, were James H. Robinson and James H. Robinson Funeral Home, of which Cleckley is associated.

“In their time of grief and need, the Hallman family hired and trusted professionals to make sure Mr. Hallman would be laid to rest with the utmost care, dignity, and respect,” said attorneys Mike Morgan and Kathryn Barnett of Morgan & Morgan. “Instead, the family learned to their horror and shock that his remains were desecrated and abandoned, left to fester and rot. We will fight to hold everyone responsible for this disgrace accountable – and to make sure no other families ever have to go through something like this again.”

On May 26, PIX11 reported that four lawsuits were filed against Cleckley and other associates of the Flatlands funeral home.

At the time of the initial allegations, Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker said in a statement the business’ actions were “appalling,” “disrespectful” and “completely unacceptable.”

As of Monday, there were nearly 2.3 million coronavirus cases in the U.S., with more than 120 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins.