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Here are the coronavirus symptoms and what to do if you're sick

Coronavirus prevention tips
Posted at 1:39 PM, Mar 25, 2020
and last updated 2020-04-26 10:56:31-04

NEW YORK — As coronavirus, or COVID-19, continues to spread across the tri-state area, health officials have stressed the importance of knowing the symptoms.

Information on social media can vary widely in terms of accuracy and credibility, so it’s important to pay attention to official medical sources such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as well as the World Health Organization.

Coronavirus symptoms can range from mild to severe and typically appear between two and 14 days after exposure, according to the CDC.

Here are the nine symptoms associated with coronavirus, according to the CDC, and what you should do if you feel sick.

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Muscle pain
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Anyone who is sick or is exhibiting these symptoms should immediately self-isolate and only leave home to seek medical attention. If possible, the CDC recommends avoiding other people in the household as well as pets. To learn more about self-isolation practices, click here.

Those who do need to seek medical care should call the doctor’s office or hospital before leaving home and wear a face mask, if possible.

Some people may experience more severe symptoms, which the CDC describes as “emergency warning signs.” Anyone who shows these symptoms should immediately seek medical attention.

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

The CDC recommends speaking with a health care provider if any other symptoms outside of this list appear severe or concerning.

Anyone who is experiencing a medical emergency and needs to call 911 should notify the operator about whether they have or believe to have coronavirus and, if possible, put on a face mask before help arrives, according to the CDC.