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Entrepreneur makes it her mission to help other business women earn seven figures

Posted at 6:26 PM, Sep 14, 2020
and last updated 2020-09-14 18:40:22-04

Rachel Rodgers started her career as a lawyer working long hours with little work life balance, but then she decided to make a change and became an entrepreneur.

Now this changemaker is in the business of helping other women learn how to hit seven figures with their companies, without having to chose between family and business.

Just a few years ago, Rodgers was an intellectual property attorney running a small law firm, clocking in long hours with no work-life balance. Then she decided to make a change and use her law experience to build a business.

Now she's a multi-millionaire and CEO of Hello Seven, working as a business coach helping other female entrepreneurs, especially women of color, figure out how to become millionaires too. Women-owned businesses account for more than 40 percent of all businesses in the U.S.

Rodgers motto is “Work Hard Once.”

"It`s all about women capitalizing on their intellectual property that they`re creating” she explained. “We have them assess their careers and their experience and what intellectual property they might have already created and not even realized, and we help them to identify where can they use their skills and work that they would really enjoy doing and match that with a need in the marketplace."

The prices of the Hello Seven programs start around $300 a month for access to her multi-level business coaching community. Free services include a blog and a podcast with interviews and business tips.

Social justice also plays an importance role in Rodgers' life and business. To promote an anti-racist business model, she organized a small business town hall and an anti-racist pledge for small business owners to sign on her website.

"The two go hand in hand, right? both making a profit and running an ethical business, those things can go together,” Rodgers explained. “So after the murder of George Floyd and the protests that happened, after that, I felt very passionate about it and it was important to me that I speak out. I wanted to give people some tangible action steps and really help them start to figure this out and really commit to building an anti-racist business going forward.”

More than 2,200 small business have signed the anti-racist pledge so far.

If you want to check out the pledge, the small business town hall or any of the tips and services Hello Seven has to offer, you can visit their website by clicking here