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See all the biggest winners at the 2020 Grammy Awards

Posted: 7:16 PM, Jan 26, 2020
Updated: 2020-01-27 05:46:53-05
2020 Grammy Awards winners
Grammy nominations have been announced

LOS ANGELES — Lizzo and Billie Eilish have won their first career Grammys.

Lizzo has won the Grammy for best pop solo performance for “Truth Hurts." She also won best traditional R&B performance for “Jerome” and best urban contemporary album for “Cuz I Love You (Deluxe)” during the Grammy Awards pre-telecast ceremony Sunday at Staples Center in Los Angeles.

“This whole week I've been lost in my problems, stressed out," Lizzo said as she accepted her third award. "Then in an instant all of that can go away.”

The 18-year-old Eilish won best pop vocal album for “When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?” and her brother and musical partner Finneas won best engineered album and producer of the year.

The late Nipsey Hussle has won his first Grammy Award.

Hussle won best rap performance Sunday for “Racks in the Middle,” which also features Roddy Ricch and Hit-Boy.

Lauren London, Hussle’s partner and the mother of his child, accepted the award with several members of Hussle’s family.

London called Hussle “a phenomenal vessel” who “did it not just for the awards, but for the people.”

The Los Angeles rapper whose real name was Ermias Joseph Asghedom, got his first Grammy nomination last year.

Less than two months later, he was shot and killed at age 33 as he stood outside his clothing store.

Beyoncé’s “Homecoming” has won the Grammy Award for best music film.

The Netflix film weaves together Beyoncé’s 2018 performances at the Coachella music festival, which included numerous nods to historically black colleges and universities.

Producer Steve Pamon in accepting the award said those working to graduate from the institutions are their inspiration. He also praised Beyoncé for her leadership on the project.

The superstar did not attend the pre-telecast ceremony where her Grammy win was announced.

Michelle Obama is a Grammy winner.

The former first lady won her first Grammy Award on Sunday for best spoken word album for the audio book of her 2019 memoir “Becoming.”

Obama was not on hand to accept the award handed out at the Staples Center in Los Angeles during the Grammys pre-telecast ceremony.

Her husband, former president Barack Obama, has two Grammys in the same category, one for his 2005 audio book “Dreams of My Father” and another for his 2007 audio book “The Audacity of Hope.”

At age 61, Tanya Tucker has won the first two Grammy Awards of her career, 48 years after her first hit at age 13.

Tucker won best country album Sunday during the pre-telecast ceremony at Staples Center in Los Angeles for “While I’m Livin’,” her first album of original material in 17 years.

She also won best country song for “Bring My Flowers Now,” which is also nominated for overall song of the year, to be presented during the main telecast later Sunday.

Tucker was a 13-year-old country child prodigy when her 1972 song “Delta Dawn” became a huge hit.

The spoken word album category includes poetry, storytelling and audio books.

Hildur Guðnadóttir is taking home a Grammy for music she first thought no one would care to hear.

The female composer won best score soundtrack for the HBO miniseries “Chernobyl” during the pre-telecast ceremony Sunday.

The soundtrack already won her an Emmy late last year. And in January she became the first woman in 19 years to win best original score for “Joker” at the Golden Globes.

“I think it fit really well with the images of the film, and I was happy with how the music worked with the narrative and characters in this series,” she said backstage of the “Chernobyl” soundtrack. “But I never thought anyone would ever listen to the soundtrack record, honestly. I’ve very surprised to be here today.”

See a list of major Grammy winners below:

Record of the year: “Bad Guy,” Billie Eilish

Album of the year: “When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?” Billie Eilish

Song of the year: "Bad Guy," Billie Eilish, Finneas O'Connell

Best new artist: Billie Eilish

Best rap/sung performance: “Higher,” DJ Khaled featuring Nipsey Hussle and John Legend

Best rap album: “Igor,” Tyler, The Creator

Best rap song: “A Lot,” 21 Savage featuring J. Cole

Best rap performance: “Racks in the Middle,” Nipsey Hussle, featuring Roddy Ricch & Hit-Boy

Best pop solo performance: “Truth Hurts,” Lizzo

Best pop vocal album: “When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?” Billie Eilish

Best pop duo/group performance: “Old Town Road,” Lil Nas X featuring Billy Ray Cyrus

Best traditional pop vocal album: “Look Now,” Elvis Costello & The Imposters

Best R&B album: “Ventura,” Anderson .Paak

Best urban contemporary album: “Cuz I Love You,” Lizzo

Best R&B song: “Say So,” PJ Morton featuring JoJo

Best traditional R&B performance: “Jerome,” Lizzo

Best R&B performance: “Come Home,” Anderson .Paak featuring Andre 3000

Producer of the year, non-classical: Finneas

Best comedy album: “Sticks & Stones,” Dave Chappelle

Best rock song: “This Land,” Gary Clark, Jr.

Best rock performance: “This Land,” Gary Clark, Jr.

Best rock album: “Social Cues,” Cage the Elephant

Best spoken word album: “Becoming,” Michelle Obama

Best American roots performance: “Saint Honesty,” Sara Bareilles

Best alternative music album: “Father of the Bride,” Vampire Weekend

Best music film: “Homecoming,” Beyonce

Best country album: “While I’m Livin’,” Tanya Tucker

Best country song: “Bring My Flowers Now,” Tanya Tucker

Best country solo performance: “Ride Me Back Home,” Willie Nelson

Best country duo/group performance: “Speechless,” Dan + Shay

Best musical theater album: “Hadestown”

Best metal performance: “7empest,” Tool

Best world music album: “Celia,” Angelique Kidjo

Best roots gospel album: “Testimony,” Gloria Gaynor

Best contemporary blues album: “This Land,” Gary Clark, Jr.

Best music video: “Old Town Road (Official Movie),” Lil Nas X featuring Billy Ray Cyrus

Best dance/electronic album: “No Geography,” Chemical Brothers

Best dance recording: “Got to Keep On,” Chemical Brothers

Best score soundtrack for visual media: Hildur Guðnadóttir, “Chernobyl”

Best contemporary instrumental album: “Mettavolution,” Rodrigo y Gabriela

Best reggae album: “Rapture,” Koffee

Best folk album: “Patty Griffin,” Patty Griffin

Best recording package: “Chris Cornell,” Chris Cornell

Best compilation soundtrack for visual media: “A Star Is Born”

Best song written for visual media: “I’ll Never Love Again,” Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper

Best jazz vocal album: “12 Little Spells,” Esperanza Spalding

Best engineered album, non-classical: “When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?” Billie Eilish

Best gospel performance/song: “Love Theory,” Kirk Franklin

Best gospel album: “Long Live Love,” Kirk Franklin

Best Latin pop album: “#Eldisco,” Alejandro Sanz

Best Latin rock, urban or alternative album: "El Mal Querer," Rosalía

Best opera recording: “Picker: Fantastic Mr. Fox”