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NRA breaks silence, promises ‘meaningful contributions’

Posted: 11:12 PM, Dec 18, 2012
Updated: 2012-12-18 23:12:04-05

Even if we finally get to bottom of why Adam Lanza murdered 27-people, and then himself, the contentious issue of gun control isn’t going away.

The White House says President Obama intends to support a proposed legislative ban on assault weapons.

And now the National Rifle Association is making it’s first comments since Friday’s massacre in Newtown Connecticut, saying in a written statement
“The NRA is prepared to offer meaningful contributions to help make sure this never happens again.”

LanzaGuns

Adam Lanza arrived at Sandy Hook Elementary School with an arsenal that included hundreds of rounds of ammo

What that means exactly…is still unclear.

But on the organization’s Facebook page, the debate is raging.

Referring to Nancy Lanza – who legally owned the assault rifle and other weapons her son used to carry out the rampage…one poster wrote, “The woman was armed heavily to defend herself, and it cost her and 26 good people their lives. Hopefully the NRA will become an org this hunter can support…by acknowledging the constitution was written before even the thought of assault weapons entered our twisted little minds.”

Another wrote, “It’s my job to protect her and my family, not Obamas or the local police. America wants something to blame like a type of gun or an elected official…Seriously…Try blaming the aggressor…”

“So if you find yourself at the mall and a scary situation arises, stand behind me in a single file line and I’ll do everything I can to be there for my fellow countrymen. I expect my brothers and sisters in arms to do the same.”

There are conflicting signals about what Lanza’s friends and acquaintances expected from him.

The 20-year old has been described as a bright loner who suffered from Asperger Syndrome – a form of autism…and a dedicated fan of violent video games.

Alan Diaz went to high school with Lanza, and says”  “We all kinda knew that like you know, he had problems socially and we had a feeling that there might have been something wrong with him but, obviously, we never asked, we never thought it was our place to do so.”